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mr. morsy's controversial decrees. he is saying that nobody can revise what i say. he is actually throwing the whole system out, totally. >> reporter: meanwhile, big developments in meeting rooms and news conferences, where factions opposed mr. morsy's moves to put pressure on the system. it seemed to weaken the judiciary, by calling for a nationwide judge's strike. also the supreme judicial committee, discussed the attack on the judiciary. they called for a one-million protest and sit-in for tuesday. what does mr. morsy's group do? they call for a one-million man protest, as well on tuesday. some critical days ahead. cairo. >>> elsewhere in the region, the signs the truce between israel and hamas is taking hold this weekend. palestinian sources say israel has eased restrictions on gaza fishermen, allowing them to go up shore. they had been restricted from going up three miles in the mediterranean. and hamas official says that egyptian and israeli officials are expected to meet monday to discuss details of the cease-fi. >>> and another sign, a positive one of recovery after that c
cases brought against the controversial decrees declared by mr. morsi last week. here's where the intrigue comes in. last week one of his decrees banned anyone, any authority, even the judiciary from questioning and overturning any of his decisions since he took office. we'll see how that plays out. meantime protests continue. there doesn't seem to be a resolution to this conflict. the leaders of the opposition factions have dug in saying we're not going to have dialogue until mr. morsi rescinds his decrees. a few hours ago we spoke to one of his top advisers and we asked him, is that a possibility? >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make. >> this decision is up to the president, not for us. >> is it possible -- is it possible he will rescind his decrees. >> dialogue with our -- >> are you prepared to consider rescinding, adjusting some of these decrees? >> decree is up to the president. we are accepting it. we may have some reservations. but as a whole we must take a step to -- forward, not to backward. >> reporter: that was one of the top advisers for mr. morsi.
including human rights activists interpret mr. morsi's powers very differently. >> he keeps promising that this is only for the next six or seven months but there are also no guarantees that the new constitution will respect fundamental rights. >> reporter: almost two years after this country's revolution ended decades of dictatorship, egypt's young democracy hangs in the balance. >> pelley: holly williams is just above tahrir square in cairo tonight. holly, you mentioned it's been nearly two years since the revolution. what's happening with the constitution? when is it going to be written? >> well, it's being drafted by a committee. they've been working on it for several months. i spoke to one of the committee members today said they should have a final draft within days and it could be put to a referendum early next year. the problem is there have been constant complaints that too many of the committee members are hard line islamists who want a much bigger role for religion in government and, in fact, this month two dozen more liberal members of the committee quit over that issue. t
importantly he told aids he considered mr. morsi a straight shooter. your reaction? >> if in fact the new york times report is correct it shows this is simple. it shows blindness on the part of the president that he doesn't understand what motivates morsi, doesn't understand that basic ideology, it shows he does not understand the muslim brotherhood's objectives. with that kind of blindness as i think he demonstrated in other foreign policy areas it is very difficult in fact impossible to formulate effective american policy. it is a bad, bad sign for the u.s. and the middle east in the weeks and months ahead. >> just live with moresy and the muslim brotherhood no matter what they do? >>> i would like to know in all of these they have with president morsi what was it that gave morsi the view that he would have a freehand to try this particular gamut that he announced on our thanksgiving of all days to essentially side line the political opposition. it generated a lot of opposition. he may not be able to succeed on all of it do you think he sees it as a reward for brokering the truce. >> he feel
of the opposition faction continue to demand mr. morsi to rescind his decrees. we just spoke to one of his senior advisers a couple of hours ago. he wants dialogue with the leading opposition factions. he didn't say anything about these decrees today. there are talks scheduled with the judges. but at this hour, no talks scheduled with the opposition factions. tomorrow big protests on both sides. both the opposing factions and mr. morsi the muslim brotherhood calling for 1 million man protests. >> interesting timing, of course, as they try to negotiate some kind of a peace treaty there or at least continuing relation of talks with the peace talks reza sayah for us. >>> holiday shoppers in full force through black friday. did you go shopping, christine? >> heck no. have you read my book, soledad? don't spend money you don't have. >> 247, that's a record, 247 million? >> it is a record number but it's stretched out over four days now. now the days are thursday through sunday. let me throw in cyber monday, right, so it all comes together in huge, huge four-day frenzy of buying. >> total spending of w
, now i'm king. megyn: what role do you think it had, if any, the praise that we gave to mr. morsi in the wake of his role in brokering a truce between hamas and israel last week >> that was strategic idiotcy. hamas was on the ropes, israel was winning on points. morsi stepped in and basically rescued hamas and got the cease-fire. our president, secretary of state, ambassador rice in the u.n. all gushed praise upon morsi and elevated him to the state us of global statesman. it was a terrible mistake because he hadn't earned that, and the next day he thumbed his nose, to put it politely at our government and the west entirely and said, i'm now in charge, i'll do what i want, egypt is going to do what i say, and, by the way, the revolution is over. megyn: does it make it tougher for us to now condemn what he's doing? so far we've had jay carney say we support democracy, we believe the government in egypt should reflect the will of the people, we have concerns about what morsi has done. >> it would be nice if we supported democracy. but i don't think this administration does. let's be
for mr. morsi. remember, the muslim brotherhood created hamas in the first place. >> can i ask you one more question, regarding qatar's role in all of this. while while iran may be supplying the arms to hamas, they brought $4 million to hamas to buy that. what does that say with our policy? they are all allies of ours. >> it raises questions. the a i mere of qatar paid the first state official visit to gaza and forked over $450 million by which hamas was able to transfer the money to iran to buy missiles. the fact of the matter is qatar is playing a dangerous game with hamas. they see themselves as the great new power player for islamist politics in the middle east and the united states has got to be a little wiser than welcoming an amir to the united states when he is funding a terrorist organization that the united states condemns as a major state sponsor of terror. >> sensitive times for sure. former u.s. ambassador marc ginsberg. why are political opponents of health care making it happen? a hybrid? most are just no fun to drive. now, here's one that will make you feel alive. meet
think mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is fragile, but this is not acceptable. this is not what the united states of america taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy, which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president. >> that was senator john mccain saying while the egyptian president's efforts in the israeli palestinian conflict are to be applauded, it's time for president obama to condemn him. early today i sat down with chris wallace for the inside scoop on his interview with the senator. >> as things heat up you had senator john mccain with you today to talk about mohammed morsi power grab. >> he's concerned. does the old saying it's not the first election, it's the second election. once people get into power, do they continue the democratic system or grab all the power. he's concerned it this could be a islamist coo. you have one who won in title election and issued decrease that give him unchecked power. now you have some of the same people, the young literal protesters
square in central cairo. mr. morsi is make iing a politi gamble that most people here will vote for a constitution that represents his own more conservative views but in doing so he has infuriated many other egyptians. for "cbs this morning," holly williams, cairo. >>> back here in the united states, many people up and down the west coast are keeping a close eye on a triple threat of storms. northern california is getting drenched this morning. and forecasters say even worse weather is yet to come. carter evans is in soggy sacramento. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. right now much of northern california is under a flood warning. this is the second of three major storms to hit the area. and already overnight here in sacramento, we've seen up to 2 1/2" of rainfall. this is the storm northern california has been bracing for. forecasters say this downpour has the potential for widespread damage. >> friday is going to be bad. sunday is going to be even worse. >> reporter: here is why californians are worried. it's not a single storm but a one, two, three punch. increasing th
thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease fire which is incredibly fragile but this is not acceptable and the united states of america taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress toward demaddress which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president. >> brian: joining us is the navy commander from the office of secretary of defense under george bush. he is jd gordon. is it up to the president to get more involved to tell morsi to stop with the absolute monarch thing. >> i think the president should stand up to the muslim brotherhood and say we will not send aid dollars to egypt. morsi put himself [pwao-fr] the courts and law. it is one dick traitorship replaced by another. we need to get tough on egypt. >> steve: when the arab spring first started people were optmistic and it is not turning out the way we hoped it would. >> no, in 2010 the survey poll in egypt found that 17 percent of the egyptians were favorable to the united states and 24 percent favorable to al-qaida and 60 percent to the isla
in a show of force, in a show of opposition, against mr. morsi. of course, all of these protests started last thursday when he announced these particular decrees. they hope with this kind of pressure, he's going to pull back. so far, suzanne, he hasn't. >> tell us about this group here. is it largely peaceful? we understand that there was a report that a protester died in tahrir square today. what do we know? >> reporter: suzanne, we did have a fatality today. we should tell you, most of these demonstrators are peaceful. they're out here chanting slogans, very much like they did in the 2011 uprising. but on the side streets leading into tahrir square, there is violence. sometimes those clashes get ugly. these are clashes mostly triggered by teenagers, 20-somethings, who throw rocks at police, police respond by firing tear gas, and today we did have a fatality, a man in his 60s, according to the health ministry, was killed when he suffocated from excessive tear gas. >> very quickly here, is there any response from the egyptian government to all of this taking place in the square? >> repor
in protest. some sued to dissolve the panel. you'll recall one of the controversial decrees announced by mr. morsi last week banned any authority, even the judiciary, from disbanding this panel. he wants it moved forward, suzanne, and one of the messages, he is aggressively pushing now is once have you this nationwide referendum, about 15 days and it's a yes vote, all those controversial decrees that people were upset about will be canceled immediately. he is hoping that will calm the opposition factions down behind us. we'll see if it does. >> yeah. we have yet to see whether or not that will satisfy the critics that have been on the streets there in tahrir square. reza, thank you so much. really appreciate it. we'll be following the story. >>> this is a piece that you're only going to see on cnn. rebels, they are making significant gains now inside syria. we're going to take you inside the country to a site where a government plane was shot down. plus, there are celebrations that are going on in ramallah, but not everybody is happy the united nations is making a move to recognize the pale
with mubarak. we are going to oust him. >> now today mr. morsi and the muslim brotherhood are scheduled to meet with the judges, the supreme judicial council, that's one of the groups that his decrees undermine. the problem is, there is no dialogue to get to the leaders of some of the other oppositions. >> and more than $4 billion as well and the judges are threatening to strike. so even with all of that, no decision for morsi to revoke that decree? >> well, we just spoke to one of his senior advisers, and he seemed to suggest that he might consider it, but many will say that if he backs up, it would be a politically wrong move for him. that it will be a sign of weakness. for now, there are no indications from his office that he wants to reverse the decree. >> and reza, just as we were going on air israel's defense minister ehud barak resigned. how could this affect today's talks between israel and hamas? >> it's not clear how ehud barak's resignation is going to impact these talks. but i doubt these talks are going to fall apart the decision for a cease-fire last week were made by the top offi
. >> the president said a month ago he didn't know whether egypt is our ally or not. >> we'll see. mr. morsi was involved in the ceasefire. but i think it is up to him now to demonstrate that he is going to stand with us, going to hohn 0or that peace treaty with israel that is so important to u.s. interests in the region, and actually facilitate what all of us would like to see there which is freedom for more egyptians. >> politically morsi seems clearly to be siding with hamas in that conflict. was he just playing for a certain element in egypt? because behind the scenes he was working with us to broker a peace. >> he is of the muslim brotherhood party. it is a party steeped in some of the very, very anti-western, anti-american ways. hamas has the same roots so it is a political situation that's very challenging but we look to him to be a leader and come down on the side of freedom and to recognize israel's right to exist as a jewish state in the region. that's what we're going to look for especially when he is coming to the white house which will come to congress to look for taxpayer aid f
with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu and egyptian president morsi and decide d that mrs. clinton needed to be there in person. she'll travel to israel first and then ramallah in the west bank and cairo to try to curtail the violence. >> clinton will emphasize the united states interests in a peaceful outcome. an outcome that can lead to improved conditions for the civilian residents of gaza. >> there are a couple of encouraging signs on the road to peace. today egypt's president said the aggression in gaza would end today and radio was saying a ceasefire could come tonight. since the fighting started a week ago more than 100 palestinians have been killed including 54 civilians according to the associated press. three israeli civilians have died. let me bring in nbc's martin fletcher in tel aviv for us and "washington post" columnist e.j. deion. mar martin, let me start with you. it sounds like, at least in the last couple of hours, they're getting closer to a deal. where do things stand? >> reporter: that's right. as you said, it is very encouraging signs. the fact that not only
by mr. abbas. the players and devices we've used in the past are difficult to use. >> what sort of political pressure, though, is morsi feeling? they have an agreement with israel. it is a relatively new government, a new construct. he's being tested essentially. hit basically from both sides. what are those dynamics like? those domestic politics for the egyptians? >> what is new now is the political leadership of egypt has a direct and personal involvement with one party, not the palestinian authority, not israel, but the hamas movement in gaza. so there is a natural affinity as stated by the prime minister and they are essentially on hamas' side ideologically. on the other hand, the president of egypt has made clear he doesn't want to throw over the israel/egypt peace agreement. how far can he go in supporting hamas without getting rid of that agreement or undermining it in a fundamental way? i expect him to go quite far. >> do you think the election affected the timing of this. did hamas step up its attacks to test the obama administration? did netanyahu act waiting for romne
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)